10 June 2017

Expedition

At the start of this month I made a blogpost called "Edge" in which I reported a little ramble I had undertaken to the southern end of Bamford Edge. 

Following the expedition I was inundated with messages from all over the world urging me to investigate the northern end of the ancient millstone edge that overlooks the valley of The River Derwent. My Twitter account was burning bright with all the requests and my e-mail inbox was full to bursting.
Old stone fence post in the middle of Bamford Moor
Not wishing to disappoint I set off yesterday, parking my trusty vehicle "Clint" near Cutthroat Bridge on the A57. Boots on, I set off through a pine grove to Jarvis Clough, along an old grouse shooters' track. Grazing sheep and their growing lambs were suddenly disturbed by my advance and darted off into the fresh green bracken or down the slope towards the moorland stream that runs at the bottom.
At Great Tor looking down to Ladybower Dam
Up the track,to the top ridge of  Hordron Edge, puffing and panting till I could see the escarpment of Stanage End far across Moscar Moor. To the west I noticed a line of grouse butts squat against the horizon and a long broken wall. Up on to Bamford Moor and then a mile over that slightly undulating plateau. At one point the deceptive ground became boggy and I found myself squelching along, hoping not to sink any further. I had gone too far across this area to turn back. As I am now writing this blogpost you will realise that I survived and am not still stuck in the middle of the moor shouting "Help!" to the empty void.
Two views of  Ladybower Reservoir
showing Ashopton Viaduct

Before too long I was back at Bamford Edge, looking down on Ladybower Reservoir. What a delightful view! Then I headed south to Great Tor and from there I could look further southwards to the section of the edge that I visited on June 2nd. The dots had been joined up.

I made it back across the moor without squelching through The Indiana Jones Bog challenge. Back to Jarvis Clough and along the track that led through the pine grove to trusty "Clint". There I swallowed half a litre of cold water in one gulp - like a human syphon. I had been out three hours and hadn't seen a single soul. Fortunately I had some dry socks in the car.

28 comments:

  1. What a beautiful part of the country you live in. That view from Great Tor and the one of the reservoir are stunning. So glad you didn't sink into the bog and lived to tell the tale. The risks you take for your readers!

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    1. Yes ADDY, one has to be valorous to be a blogger on the edge. Like a BBC war correspondent.

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  2. Cutthroat Bridge? That sounds... ominous!
    Beautiful countryside, and of course (you guessed that, didn't you) the third picture is my favourite here - framed, it would grace any wall.
    Glad you braved the Indiana Jones Bog challenge and lived to tell the tale! Even more glad that your knee allowed for a 3 hour walk.

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    1. The knee was sore at the end but I wasn't limping.

      Cutthroat Bridge near Ladybower reservoir takes its gruesome name from a 400-year-old murder.

      An old document tells us that a chap named Robert Ridge came across a man with a wound in his throat in Eashaw Clough. The proper name is Highshaw Clough but local dialect gives us Eashaw.

      The man was still alive. Ridge and other helpers carried him to a house half a mile away, and then on to Bamford Hall where he died two days later.

      The victim had been found lying about 40 yards (37m) from where a road bridge was later built. Remembering the murder, local people always referred to it as Cutthroat Bridge.

      The present Cutthroat Bridge was built in 1821. Another murder victim was found here a few years ago, minus his head. Two Sheffield men were charged with causing his death.

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  3. Amazing, and quite beautiful, Mr Pud. Although I must admit looking at your photo of Great Tor makes me feel a little ill!

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  4. Hmm, thinking of Cutthroat Bridge makes me feel even more ill!

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    1. You can always take a couple of anti-Yorkshire Pudding pills Rozzie!

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  5. Really stunning landscape, and great photos. Greetings!

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    1. Thank you Blogoratti. Having stayed in London recently, it's nice to get out to a wild and people-free landscape. It does one's inner soul a lot of good.

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  6. Mr. Pud,
    I envy you the little rambles accessible within short distances from home, and no less your photos of the landscapes with the added fascination of name, but I am awed by the portrait - an evident moment of sweet accord. Lovely! McGregor

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    1. It was love at first sight but I had to hang on to the horns McG.

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  7. Nice scenery. Not quite so nice down here. I always remember Sheffield because of the views you get up there. There's nowhere in England quite like it.

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    1. I grew up in East Yorkshire. The landscape is very different over there. Hull is such a flat city compared with Sheffield.

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  8. Great post and fantastic pictures. Thank you..!

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    1. Thanks for coming by and leaving a nice comment Sheila. Much appreciated.

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  9. You really do live in such a beautiful part of England. I agree with Meike--some of your landscape photographs would look great framed and on display.

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    1. Thank you Jennifer. I am always aiming for lovely pictures even though they don't always work out.

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  10. What is the difference between a stone fence and a stone wall? You rapped me on the knuckles awhile back for calling a stone wall a fence! Please explain, along with a list of the pros and cons of each. Worth 30 points out of 100.

    Are you making up the following words? otherwise please provide full definitions of each: grouse butts, clough, tor, hordron. Where possible, please give the Canadian equivalent. Worth 40 points out of 100.

    Compare and contrast the squelchy bog and the top of the cliff, using the following words in your description: high, low, wet, dry, amazing, scary, good idea, bad idea. Worth 30 points out of 100.

    Seriously, though, sometimes the differences in language make it seem like we are not both speaking English! But the pictures -- well, they are in a universal language. Beautiful.

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    1. Hell's bells Jenny! If I answered all your questions in detail I would be here until midnight so I will just stick with the wall/fence issue. In England, a fence is made from wood or wire. A wall is made from brick or stone. Many of the drystone walls of Yorkshire and Derbyshire have been in existence for hundreds of years - requiring very little maintenance. They endure.

      Although my second picture shows a stone post it was only a structural device in past years when the moor was divided between two rich landowners. There are holes in that post and through them thick wires were once threaded.

      At the risk of offending you I would humbly suggest that Canada has adopted much of its questionable English vocabulary from American English. For example, you call a garden a yard! This is hilarious and so, so wrong my friend!

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    2. Well done - 30/30 which represents 100%, YP! Thank you for the explanation. And no offense taken; Britain may be our sibling/mother/cousin (??) but the USA is our next-door neighbour and proximity requires a common language, although not necessarily common spelling :)

      Calling a garden a yard is better than calling it a meter/metre :D

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  11. Love the views of Ladybower YP - many years since I went there.

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    1. I have seen Laybower from every vantage point but I think that this was the best position.

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  12. What a beautiful area! who cares about the millstones!

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    1. The millstones I showed you before are only a mile and a half from Great Tor.

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  13. Amazing views, especially from Great Tor looking down. The sheep looks like she's wearing someone else's coat.

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    1. That's why I snapped her Sue. It looks like she has pinched a sheepskin rug from a washing line.

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  14. I heard a faint cry in the distance...."I'm a celebrity! Get me out of here!"...but, after now reading your post, I realise it wasn't you calling out for assistance, after all! I was about to rush to your aid.

    It appears your knee is holding up well, pain-free, and that is good to know if, in fact, that is the case.

    Wonderful photos. :)

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    1. When I look back to the months of March and April when I limped everywhere, I am grateful that my knee has been holding up of late. I felt discomfort as I returned to Clint but not enough to make me limp. It's such a joy to be out and about gain though I continue to take care.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.